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Matthew Collins
Matthew Collins

The Serpent



The serpent was purchased by the Crosby Chamber of Commerce, currently the Cuyuna Lakes Chamber of Crosby. The city of Crosby, while surrounded by lakes, burrows itself on the shores of Serpent Lake. There are rumors that these waters are inhabited by a mythical sea serpent, but a more likely explanation is the shape of the lake led to its namesake.




The Serpent


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As of 2009, www.serpentwebsite.COM is being redirected from both www.serpentwebsite.ORG and www.serpentwebsite.NET. This is an experimental association and might not be continued. If creating or modifying links to the Serpent Website, please use ONLY the .COM extension.


A variety of weapons including energy rifles, flamethrowers, gas grenades, staffs which fire energy bolts, staves which can be used as clubs or can transform into serpents which wrap themselves around an enemy and shock them with electricity, poison dart guns or energy firing nunchucks.


Indeed, the place itself is transformative. To embrace the serpent may be to digest strange dreams, but an overhead shot of the terrain ultimately suggests another meaning. From above, it's clear that the river coils through the forest like an endless snake.


A towering dust devil casts a serpentine shadow over the Martian surface in this image acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.


The Serpent is a truly unique ring. These rings start as a solid rod of Damascus steel that is hand forged into a serpentine pattern. The ring is then machined by hand into a beautiful ring by one of our talented machinists. An exquisite serpent scale pattern occurs after acid etching due to the unique manufacturing process of the Damascus. Then a deep space glowstone inlay - consisting of meteorite, amethyst, malachite, and space colored glowstone - is added to the center of the ring.


The serpent was probably invented in 1590 by Edme Guillaume, a canon at Auxerre. It was used in sacred music to reinforce low men's voices. When well played, it blends with voices and gives a depth to the choral sound. During the next two hundred years after its invention, it was used as a military band instrument and later evolved into the ophicleide and tuba.


The serpent has six finger holes arranged in two sets of three with a fundamental note of C. Note that without a hole for the thumb, the b and the c at the top of the each octave are both fingered the same, with the difference in pitch being made by lip adjustment. As with the cornett and lizard , it takes great skill and practice to get a good sound since every note depends on the player's correct embouchure and pitch accuracy. Only the fundamental has much clarity of sound. Chromatics are obtained by half-opening the finger holes or by fork fingering. The conical tube of the serpent is over six feet in length. Its construction is similar to that of the smaller cornetts and it has an elbow shaped crook to bring the mouthpiece to the player's lips. The wood body (often walnut) is sometimes made from several fairly short pieces joined together and covered with leather; other times, glued up from two complete halves of hollowed out blocks of wood. Like the lizard, the serpentine shape of the instrument brings the finger holes and mouthpiece within reach of the player. Its range can extend to three octaves.


"Wood dry and full of rot, leather cracking, and often equipped with a mouthpiece for some other instrument, serpents were hung on walls to collect dust, only to be taken down by well- (or ill-) meaning `experts' who would blast a few notes and pronounce the serpent `unplayable' and a detestable thing."-Douglas Yeo


"And when, as time passed, the serpent and the ophicleide helped out the bass of the harmony, the cup of misery must have been full to overflowing."-The Musical Companion, edited by A.L. Bacharach, 1946


In a bizarre reversal of nature, an 8-year-old boy in India killed a cobra after biting it in retaliation. The child bit back at the dangerous animal after receiving a rare venom-free "dry bite" from the serpent, according to reports. 041b061a72


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